Sunday, 11 December 2016

Candle Lighting Day

Worldwide Candle Lighting Day was a gift to the bereavement community from The Compassionate Friends. The Compassionate Friend’s Worldwide Candle Lighting Day started in the United States in 1997 as a small internet observance in honour of children who lived tragically short lives for any number of reasons, from sickness, to accidents, to war, but has since spread throughout the world.

Nowadays, hundreds of formal candle lighting events are held in many different countries and thousands of informal candle lightings are conducted in homes as families gather in quiet remembrance of children who have died, but will never be forgotten. many organizations join in to observe this holiday, some of which are local bereavement groups, churches, funeral homes, hospitals, hospices, children’s gardens, schools, cemeteries, and community centres, and remembrance services have ranged in size from just a few people to nearly a thousand over the years since the creation of this special day. All of this just goes to show how necessary it was to set this day aside for this purpose.

How to Celebrate World Candle Lighting Day

As mentioned before, this day is celebrated with a quiet elegance: at 7 p.m. local time, people light candles for one hour to remember their loved ones. It is a moving occasion that bypasses geographical and cultural divides. As everyone lights their candles at seven pm local time, far-flung parts of the world get illuminated in turn, so that eventually the light has moved all around the globe. If you have experienced the loss of a child in your lifetime, this is a good moment to honour his or her memory by taking part in the candle lighting. You could also invite some close family members to spend this time with you and light their own candles for the late sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, and grandchildren.

This doesn’t only have to be a sad occasion, however. Children’s lives are mostly filled with fun and laughter, so reminiscing about all of the things the child you are honouring managed to enjoy before he or she passed may should serve to lighten the atmosphere up a little bit. Of course, nothing will ever make up for the loss of a child, but there is some solace to be taken in the fact that the child’s life was a good one, however short. No matter whether you’ll be lighting a candle at home or joining a gathering Worldwide Candle Lighting Day it is a way to show love and community.

6 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing such a lovely tradition, Han. I am so fortunate that I have not faced the loss of a child. My heart goes out to those who have.

    Hugs and blessings...Cat

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A colleague of mine lost his son some years ago, and never got over it. His wife went to pieces, marriage broke up and he committed suicide later. Nothing more for to live, any more. So I'm burning a candle for Peter and his son today.

      Han

      Delete
  2. I didn't know anout this day.
    Thank you for telling us, Han.

    Mona Lisa

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seems like a good idea in a children's hospital Mona Lisa.

      Han

      Delete
    2. I know. Still once a year, maybe in every window of hospital... Just to remember all the people in the city what tragedies take place there?

      Forget it,
      Han

      Delete

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